Session Information

Session 1: 10:15 - 11:00 am CST

Presenter:
Livia Castellanos
Organization: 
Ministry of Advanced Education
Abstract:
Saskatchewan’s International Education Strategy lays the foundation for a global approach to position the province as a destination of choice for international students and provides opportunities for Saskatchewan students to study in other countries. We invite you to join this session to learn more about how students, faculty and practitioners can become engaged in internationalization in Saskatchewan and abroad.

ruraled/schedule1/sk-ies-prez-to-rural-congress-international-highlighted-session-mar-28.221.pptx

 

Presenters:
Katherine Oviatt, Amanda Moosemay and Bryan McNabb 
Organization:
Horizon School Division 
Abstract: 
In September of 2021, Horizon School Division began a project designed to decolonize curriculum for Indigenous students attending our provincially run but federally funded school on George Gordon First Nation. The Horizon Board of Education received the 2021 Premier’s Board of Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in Education for this project. The project will become the foundation of the Horizon School Division Framework for Indigenous Education. Funding for this project has come from the McDowell Foundation, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Education Early Learning Cultural Project, and other local sources. 

This project is in direct response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) 10th and 12th Call to Action, which Includes: “developing culturally appropriate curricula” (TRC, 2016, p.149) ad developing “culturally appropriate early childhood education programs for Aboriginal families” (TRC, 2016, p. 152).  The project is intended to not only develop culturally appropriate curricula but to develop an instructional model that will continually inform schools, teachers, and Horizon School Division in the implementation of high quality responsive instruction for Indigenous students.  This project builds on the mutually respectful relationship between Horizon School Division and its First Nation partners. 

Typically, instructional planning involves teachers designing learning based on the (Western) curriculum outcomes and then adding cultural components.  The premise of this project is to begin with traditional ways of knowing and find curricula within them.  While it is important to identify and assess curricular outcomes within this project, the focus of the project is to improve engagement and thereby retention of curricular concepts and to develop a deeper connection and partnership between the community and the classroom – to redefine the relationship between Indigenous people and school.  The continual inclusion of Elders, Knowledge Keepers, parents, caregivers, and community members is key to the sustainable success of the project. 

Horizon School Division intends to continue this instructional model beyond this single project but extend it to similar designs moving forward as we decolonize and redefine learning for Indigenous students and families. 

1 Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Calls to Action.  Nctr.ca. Retrieved 17 March 2021, from https://nctr.ca/assets/reports/Final%20Reports/Executive_Summary_English_Web.pdf 

ruraled/schedule1/rural-congress-1.pdf

Presenters:
Professor John Aluko Orodho
Organization:
Kenyatta  University 
Abstract: 
This paper examines the innovations in rural areas in Kenya. The study is based on combinations of desktop   research and case studies conducted in marginalized rural areas in Kenya.  The study is conceptualized in the context of Kenya’s new 2:6:6:3 education system, which is competency based. Results indicate that while Kenya has attained tremendous achievements by recording targeted GER and NER in education at national level, unpacking the success story by geographical locations reveals shockingly wide and deep disparities in access and quality education in marginalized rural areas. The main factors retarding implementation of CBC in rural areas are lack of internet connectivity, poverty, low premium attached to education, aridity and retrogressive socio-cultural practices. It is recommended that research based evidence on what works for rural areas should inform the development of relevant and   innovative education in rural areas.

ruraled/schedule1/orodho-powerpoint-usask_presentation-national-congress-on-rural-ed-2022.pptx

Presenter:
Dr. P. Arunachalam 
Organization:
Tamil Nadu Agricultural University  
Abstract: 
The Ramanathapuram district is one of the drought prone and aspirational districts of the country and practicing rain dependent agriculture. The climatic vulnerabilities like dry-spells and intensity of heavy rainfall in short period are major constrains in raising successful crop. Through the scientific interventions of agro technologies, Krishi Vigyan Kendra had intervened to uplift the livelihood of the rain fed famers in the Ramanathapuram district. The methodology followed to educate on rain fed agricultural technologies are:  

  1. educate village farmers through capacity building programs,
  2. Enhanced crop choice by diversification, 
  3. Popularization of climate resilient varieties, 
  4. Demonstration of yield enhancement and drought mitigation technologies, 
  5. rain water harvesting and recycling for managing dry spells,  
  6. Organize field days to showcase the technology impact, and vii.  

Awareness creation to adopt IFS with livestock and fodder production for alternate income generation. This presentation focus on how these learning helped the farmers to adopt to climate abnormalities and helped to raise successful crop to get remunerative income towards improving standard of living of rain fed farmers. 

ruraled/schedule1/copy-of-p.-arunachalam,-india---usask_presentation-ncrec-2022.pptx

Presenter:
Changxue Yu 
Organization:
Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in Canada 
Abstract: 
In this session, the author gives the audience a brief introduction to the development of rural education in China. The author also shares the views on the experience of China's rural education in achieving comprehensive development achievements.  
Meanwhile, the author talks about the opinions on China's rural education's sustainable and healthy development. At the end of the session, the author figures out the possible problems and resolutions to further develop China's rural education. 

ruraled/schedule1/20220326-the-development-of-rural-education-in-china.pptx

Presenter:
Prof. Harsh Purohit 
Organization:
Banasthali Vidyapith University 
Abstract: 
While the financial literacy has been viewed as an imperative for inclusiveness in economic development of India, not much efforts were made to make it popular in the rural settings by reinventing it in the cultural context and hence the researchers at Banasthali Vidyapith, a premier women’s university nestled in rural ambiance, developed a new model called Bhartiya Model of Financial Literacy (BMFL) to educate underprivileged rural women in district Tonk of the Rajasthan State.  This paper summarizes the impact of the program under the “Knowledge-Action-Reflection-Wisdom” framework in bringing not just an attitudinal change but also generating a paradigm shift in the confidence of the women that ultimately enhanced the happiness in the family.  The study reflects the outcome of the work carried in the last seven years encompassed under 22 performance indicators classified under the basic, advanced and cultural perspectives.  Overjoyed with the good response of the beneficiaries, the program team is looking forward to introduce it in other villages of India as well as sharing the food practice with voluntary organizations based in other countries of the world including Canada.
Presenter:
Dr. Tran Thi Thanh Ha 
Organization:
University of Education, Vietnam National University 
Abstract: 
The funds of knowledge approach has been increasingly studied and applied to teaching practices in many developed countries. Learning about students’ funds of knowledge and incorporation into their learning enables teachers to increase relevant learning experiences, empowering a socio-constructivist approach to teaching and learning. It is acknowledged to help students learn meaningfully by connecting lessons to students’ funds of knowledge, especially to ethnic minority students, color, immigrant students, or disadvantaged students. However, there is a lack of studies and papers on the funds of knowledge approach in education in Vietnam. The present aims to introduce this educational approach and contribute to solving the challenges that ethnic minority education in Vietnam is facing. It also suggests further studies to promote the application of the Funds of knowledge approach in Vietnam, thereby improving the quality of ethnic minority education in Vietnam and value the cultural resources, languages, and local knowledge of ethnic minority groups in Vietnruraled/schedule1/thi-thanh-ha-tran_presentation-national-congress-on-rural-ed-2022.pptxam. 

Presenters:
Sphamandla Zulu and Thabisile Nkambule 
Organization:
University of the Witwatersrand 
Abstract: 
There is no perfect way to teach or learn science. Teacher’s discourses to science teaching and students’ challenges with science learning in school are well documented in literature. However, opportunities provided and/or not provided by rural context in science learning have not received prominence in science education research, despite their importance in policy implementation. Therefore, in this paper we describe and discuss physical science learners’ accounts of how they learn the subject in the rural contexts and factors influencing how they learn are also examined. We used Bronfenbrenner’s Bioecological systems theory and Fairclough’s analytical framework of Critical Discourse Analysis to interpret and make meaning of learners interviews. The findings of this paper indicate that learners leaned better when involved in hands-on activities such experiments; and through problem solving. Individual leaner’s agency (self-study), external stakeholders’ assistance, and career driven urge are some of the factors for physical science enrollment and learning.  

ruraled/schedule1/canada-2022-presentation.ppt

Presenters:
Dr. Jerry Johnson and Dr. Hobart Harmon 
Organization:
Kansas State University 
Abstract: 
Rural schools in many countries are educating students in ways that add value to the future viability of the school and the community.  In this session we describe how applications of collaborative leadership focused on the community capitals framework (CCF) could enable students and schools to activate and enhance community assets to achieve the three pillars of sustainable development: economically viable, environmentally friendly, and socially just.  In this way, education’s purpose reinforces and leverages the mutually beneficial relationship between rural schools and their communities.  We provide practical examples for each of the seven elements of the CCF: built capital, cultural capital, financial capital, human capital, natural capital, political capital and social capital.  Sharing of “community projects” by session participants will also provide examples for facilitated discussion of their contribution to one or more of the asset-building community capitals. 

Session 2: 11:05 –11:50 am CST

Presenters:
Kim Fick
Carlene Genis
Organization:
Biggar School
Abstract: 
Newcomer families face unique experiences and challenges in rural Saskatchewan. How can our schools and school community councils support our families through this transition?  Join us as our team shares our school perspective on what we have learned and some ideas for ways your school community can move forward together

Presenters:
Jacqueline Kirk, Natacha Ofwono and Rachel Svistovski 
Organization:
Brandon University and Southwest Horizon School Division 
Abstract: 
During the period of remote learning in the Spring of 2020, Southwest Horizon School Division in Manitoba hosted a series of online meetings for teachers. The meetings facilitated information sharing and connected teachers, who could support each other during these challenging times. The purpose of this phenomenological study, undergirded by sociocultural learning theory, was to collect the lived experiences of teachers during the pandemic with the intention to identify and record their professional growth during that time. The data included document analysis of records that were compiled by the school division, interviews with 8 teachers, and interviews with the Strategic Initiatives Learning Coordinator, and the Superintendent. The findings included common experiences of teachers during the pandemic, both positive and negative, and a list of 12 areas of growth in their professional practice that the teacher participants hoped they could maintain following the pandemic.

ruraled/kirkofwono_stickybits_usask_presentation-national-congress-on-rural-ed-2022.pptx

Presenter:
Robert Mitchell 
Organization:
University of Colorado Springs
Abstract: 
For many rural schools, students have little variation to the teachers they are exposed throughout secondary school. It is very possible, for example, that a student may have the same math or art teacher for six-to-twelve years of their educational experience in rural environments.   
  
To remedy this issue, one college faculty member has been active in taking over as the teacher of record for specific courses in a remote, rural school. This practice and experience has proven to be highly beneficial as students have been exposed to new teaching methods and content, teachers in the school can leverage the expertise of the faculty member for professional development, and the introduction of a new individual has provided a renewed energy with the inclusion of a new voice within the school.   
  
Information about this practice and the benefits involved are included in this presentation. 

ruraled/a-different-voice---presentation.pptx

Presenter:
Dr. Elaine Westbrook 
Organization:
Montana State University Billings 
Abstract: 
In order to develop science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) knowledge and diverse solutions that address global concerns, there is a need to develop pathways to strengthen STEM interest among rural youth. Previous research suggests that informal STEM programs can stimulate participant interest (Rogoff, et al, 2016). However, little is known about which instructional methods will support the development of rural youth STEM interest. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of three instructional methods (hands-on, role models, and culminating projects) on STEM interest development for rural youth (n=26), ages eight to twelve, in an informal place-conscious STEM program. Data were collected through observations and focus group interviews. Results indicated STEM interest increased through collaborative work, new knowledge, and action research.  

ruraled/westbrook-presentation-national-congress-on-rural-ed-2022.pptx

Presenters:
Dr. Barbara Gustofson
Dr. Jerome Cranston
Ms. Pirita Mattola
Organization:
Saskatchewan Polytechnic
University of Regina
University of Saskatchewan
Abstract: 
This panel discussion will highlight Internationalization in Saskatchewan Post-Secondary Institutions as it relates to rural education.  Moderator and panelists will discuss international education policies, programming and supports for international newcomers to Saskatchewan rural settings and other outbound global opportunities with rural education in mind.
Moderator: Dr. Vicki Squires, Interim Associate Dean, Research, Graduate Support and International Initiatives & Associate Professor, Department of Educational Administration, SELU Director, University of Saskatchewan

Presenters:
Christopher French, Kerrie Laird, Michelle Matthews, Elaine McGowan, Lynne Brennan, Kim Dodd, Jamie Petrie 
Organization:
Education Scotland 
Abstract: 
This presentation outlines the collaborative enquiry process and thinking of six primary headteachers, across five local authorities in Scotland from the Highlands in north to the Scottish Borders in the south. Their interest was around System changes needed for Headteachers to more fully enact their empowerment in a collaborative manner. Their research and comparison of the Scottish Education system to the highest performing countries was key to their enquiry approach. 
This Collaborative Enquiry group developed a strong collaborative culture through the process as they enquired and reflected deeper into their research and findings. Their work, collaboration and connection continues across their diverse contexts.

ruraled/usask_presentation-national-congress-on-rural-ed-2022-final.pptx

Presenter:
Uli Frank Gräbener 
Organization:
Eberswalde University of Sustainable Development Germany 
Abstract: 
The university in Eberswalde, Germany goes back to a forestry academy that was founded in 1821 at the initiative of Georg Ludwig Harting in Berlin, Germany's capital. The task of the forestry academy was to ensure‚ the scientifically based technical training for the forestry service in Prussia. However, the head of the academy, Professor Wilhelm Pfeil, quickly realized that forestry training could not succeed far away from the forest. He moved the academy to Eberswalde, a small town not far from Berlin in the middle of large forest stands.  
This insight is still influential for Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development today: we believe studies should take place close to the subject.  We think that study programmes such as‚ Forestry, Organic Agriculture and Marketing, Sustainable Regional Development or Biosphere Reserve Management are right on the spot here, in Eberswalde.  The university has come a long way from the times of a forestry academy.  Today, we believe that the university triggers new approaches in land use, and significantly contributes to sustainable development, especially in rural areas.

ruraled/presentation-hnee-at-ruraleducation.pdf

Presenters:
Curtis Bourassa and Raquel Oberkirsch 
Organization:
South East Cornerstone Public School Division 
Abstract: 
South East Cornerstone Public School Division is committed to teaching Treaty Education in meaningful, authentic ways and infusing global competencies and 21st-century skills such as critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, and communication. SECPSD has a team of instructional coaches who support teachers to teach this content and integrate these skills into their classrooms.  
In this presentation, we (Instructional Coach for Instructional Technology and Instructional Coach for Indigenous & Treaty Education) will share ways we use Minecraft Education Edition for students to represent their learning through an iterative design cycle. Using mini-lessons and corresponding build challenges, students work in small groups to demonstrate their understanding of the reasons for Treaties, broken Treaty promises, Treaty symbols, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action, and more. We will discuss the structure of these cross-curricular projects and share examples of student work, highlighting the deep learning that occurs when students construct meaningful products.

Presenters:
Paige Fisher, Rachel Moll, Lois Philipp, Jayne Arychuk, Anita Lafferty and Denise McDonald 
Organizations:
Vancouver Island University, Vancouver Island University, Northern Loco NWT, University of Alberta
Abstract: 
Rural communities across Canada experience drastic shortages of teachers due to significant challenges in recruitment and retention. This presentation is about a rural teacher education initiative that is in a process of co-creation between Vancouver Island University and educators in the NWT.  
Our vision is to offer a program that will allow teacher candidates to stay in the North as much as possible, thus opening pathways for more Indigenous youth and community members to qualify as teachers with a powerful motivation to seek positive change in their communities.  
We are co-creating a program deeply connected to community, identity and story by offering rich experiential and land-based learning that honours Indigenous ways of knowing. We draw upon the wisdom that has existed on the land and in communities for time immemorial while acknowledging the intergenerational trauma and systemic inequities that create barriers to young people’s success. 

ruraled/nwt-viu-co-creation-presentation.pdf

Presenters:
Sharonda Pruitt, Kriss Kemp Graham, Tami Morton 
Organization:
Texas A & M University
Abstract: 
Significance: This program is significant because it seeks to identify the key knowledge and skills gained by students, teachers, and school administrators in a rural post-secondary and economic development program. 
Abstract/Overview: ACES will provide a work-based course with exploratory learning opportunities for a cohort of students in Commerce and Community Independent School Districts. Students will be mentored by a College Advisor Mentor in high school and college, receive assessment tutoring, participate in a summer immersion camp, and explore local industries. 
Literature Review: The literature that supports the need for this research focuses on rural anchor institutions, post-secondary success and collaborative university community engagement. Understanding how these ideas interact provides support for a collaborative program that seeks to provide community changes, in this instance, stronger, knowledgeable students in the community. 
Anchor institutions are organizations that have a large presence in communities. These institutions include hospitals, school districts, and universities. These organizations work to make the lives of community members better. To improve the lives of citizens, it is imperative that anchor institutions collaborate. This joining of forces is referred to as anchor collaboratives (Porter and Pham 2018). At the root of the Aspire Community Teacher Program is the collaboration between a local university and a local school district. Like many anchor collaboratives, the joint ventures focus on finding a common element that unites the participants. 
The common element in this research is working in the community, particularly schools. This work will help to create possibilities for the future of the children whom educational leaders serve (Cipollone et al 2018). As education leaders seek to serve students, the lives of the students they serve must also be the focal point. To achieve this, it is important to be sure that leaders understand the students, and their own, lived experiences, and how discussing those experiences can make stronger leaders. 
While anchor institutions are important, it is imperative that thought be given to the teacher turnover. Recent research has focused on teacher turnover that occurs monthly, throughout the school year (Redding and Henry 2019). Traditional thought focuses on teacher turnover taking place one a year. Since school leaders are only as strong as the teachers they lead, consideration must also be given to the teachers lived experiences (2019). Understanding the forces that could lead to teacher turnover, especially among teachers of color in rural areas, will help in making joint effort like the ACT useful to school leaders whose student need strong educational structures. 

Session 3: 12:45 –1:30 pm CST

Presenters:
Nadeeka Chandrasiri, Leke Jingwa and Tenneisha Nelson
Organizations:
North West College and University of Saskatchewan 
Abstract: 
Every year, Canada welcomes thousands of newcomers and international students wishing to take advantage of world-class education and the labour market gap.  According to the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), Canada has the third largest international student population, amounting to 646,000 students as of the 2019-2020 academic year.  With this number of newcomers coming into Canada, more rapid integration into the community is necessary to ensure that they settle and integrate effectively into the workplaces and society.  However, many newcomers continue to face significant barriers in their effort to integrate.  This panel discussion aims to explore the esperiences of newcomers and how they can overcome some of their challenges.

 ruraled/international-students-experiences.pptx

Presenter:
Kevin Van Lagen
Organization:
Prairie Land School Division 
Abstract: 
In 2014, Altario School was at its lowest enrollment and a conversation regarding closing the school was being initiated. In 2022, Altario School is now thriving through its agriculture program. Not only has the enrollment in the school increased, the local community has more than doubled in population and the amount of youth in the community has grown exponentially. In this presentation, Kevin will articulate the importance of rural education, how to create a unique, school saving program, and how to use a school to revive a community. 

Presenters:
Conor Barker and Daunean Dash 
Organization:
St. Francis Xavier University 
Abstract: 
Students with exceptional learning needs benefit from inclusive classroom environments to support their learning and success in school. High student needs, with fewer resources for adaptations and accommodations, and greater barriers to accessing specialized supports are present in rural schools. Rural school psychologists are qualified mental health practitioners that serve students within their home communities. They are foundational team members of student support teams, but are often under-utilized. Expanded engagement of school psychologists would build capacity for inclusive education in rural schools. This presentation will review research that explores the specialized competencies of rural school psychologists. Increased engagement with rural school psychologists can improve inclusive practices within rural communities, by optimizing competencies of teaching, administrative, and support staff. This presentation will provide insights for participants to best support and engage with school psychologists in the provision of inclusive classrooms in rural settings that benefit students with exceptional learning needs.

ruraled/barker--dash---rural-congress-2022.pptx

Presenter:
Samuel Agyei Agyare 
Organization:
Dept. of Ed Admin, University of Saskatchewan  
Abstract: 
Education enhances national development by empowering people to improve on their general wellbeing (World Bank, 2003).  This explains why governments in countries such as Ghana make deliberate efforts to introduce policies aimed at increasing school enrolment. Such policies are intended to take away the hindrance of poverty in the acquisition of education. (Akyeampong, 2009; Djangmah, 2011; Pajibo & Tamanja, 2017; Atta & Manu, 2015; Mohammed & Kuyini, 2020).  
Despite the increased student enrolment brought about by the Free Senior High School (FSHS) policy in Ghana, the dropout rate in schools like Goka Senior High School in the Jaman North District is alarming. When the FSHS policy was introduced in 2017, 630 students were placed in the school. However, only 522 students wrote their final exams in 2020. This means that 108 students (17%) had dropped out. In 2018, 296 students were admitted. This number has now reduced to 230, indicating that 66 students (22%) from that cohort are no more in school (School Register, 2017-2021). Notwithstanding this dropout rate, quite a significant number of students has overcome all the seemly challenges posed by the school community and are able to get to their final year and eventually complete high school education.  

ruraled/samuel-agyei-agyare--rural-congress-2022.mp4

Presenters:
Kristen L. White and Laura M. Kennedy 
Organization:
Northern Michigan University
Abstract: 
The presenters share designed-based research findings from an ongoing study in this presentation.  The scholars examine how two white teacher educators in different disciplines collaborate across undergraduate reading and math methods courses.  Teaching in a predominantly white, monolingual, rural teacher education program, the researchers aim to improve how they prepare teacher candidates with the practices and dispositions of culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogy.  Results suggest that access to diverse children’s picturebooks and field-based experience facilitate teacher candidates in learning how to facilitate equitable talk during elementary mathematics and literacy instruction.  During the presentation, the presenters provide course syllabi, shared course projects, and picturebooks about mathematics practices and content by culturally and linguistically diverse authors.  This research has the potential to contribute specific practices for rural teacher educators in sustaining a socially just approach to the professional preparation of teachers.

Presenter:
Andrea Precht Gandarillas
Organization:
Universidad Catolica Del Maule
Abstract: 
This paper seeks to problematize rural schools, families and communities' relationship from the analysis of the "Policy of participation of families and community in educational institutions" document from the Chilean Ministry of Education. In analyzing the policy document, we aim to determine who makes up this relationship, how it is constructed, and what practices are legitimized or de-legitimized. The analysis consisted of a multimodal critical discourse analysis that sought to see the rural actors' representation in the social action "participation in the school". 
Among the most outstanding results, the invisibilization of rural educational communities and the non-recognition of the particularities of their participation in the school life of their children stand out. It discusses the implications of this invisibility from the perspective of social justice.

ruraled/usask_presentation-national-congress-on-rural-ed-2022.pptx

Presenters:
Dr. Ted Amendt, Ms. Sarah Phipps and Dr. James McNinch
Organization:
Saskatchewan School Boards Association and Holy Trinity School Division
Abstract: 
In 2021, the Ministry of Education approved a pilot home visits initiative with the Saskatchewan School Boards Association.  Five school divisions are participating in this initiative.  Home visits are a high-impact strategy for family engagement.  A study by Johns Hopkins University in 2019 found that schools that systematically implemented parent teacher home visits experienced decreased rates of student chronic absenteeism and increased rates of student English Language Arts and math proficiency.  Home visits also interrupt bias and judgment, and have demonstrated benefits for teachers, parents/families, as well as students. 
Saskatchewan has a rich history in community education philosophy and practices in the Pre-K-12 education sector.  Based upon this history, and adapting a model from the Parent Teacher Home Visits organization (www.pthvp.org), five school divisions are participating in a research project that is document the implementation as staff conduct relational home visits.   
This session will provide a brief overview of the project, and will showcase the experience of one of the participating school divisions with the project to date.  The session will also identify the themes from the research that are emerging to date.

ruraled/rural-congress-presentation.pdf

Presenters:
Jennifer Godfrey Anderson and Jodie Lane
Organizations:
Memorial University and Nunatsiavut Government
Abstract: 
Prior to the pandemic, jurisdictions across Canada and the world we re-focusing their curricular content and assessment measures on higher-order competencies (OECD, 2018).  The upheaval as a result of the pandemic, as well as revelations regarding residential schooling, has had a tremendous bearing on the identity of Canadian educators and education and heightened the awareness that traditional programming and delivery methods do not serve contemporary educational needs.  Teaching to develop competencies has only become more critical to increase resiliency and success for young people and society.  However, operationalizing skills such as critical thinking and creativity, self-direction and global citizenship (CMEC, 2021), into the fabric of general educational practice poses considerable challenges.  Our results show that many of these skill are imbedded in community-and land-based experience and we argue that integrating these learning experiences into curriculum, and developing assessment practices to capture them can help to reveal the strengths in culturally relevant curriculum and instruction and better meet the challenges of education in the 21st century. 
 
Works Cited 
Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (2021). Measuring up: Canadian Results of the OECD PISA 2018 Study.  The performance of Canadian 15-Year-Olds in Global Competence.   
Retrieved from: https://www.cmec.ca/Publications/Lists/Publications/Attachments/419/PISA2018_GC_Report_EN.pdf. ISBN 978-0-88987-520-3 
OECD: Teaching, assessing and learning creative and critical thinking skills in education. (2018). Retrieved from  
https://www.oecd.org/education/ceri/assessingprogressionincreativeandcriticalthinkingskillsineducation.htm
Presenter:
Mike Stefaniuk
Organization:
SaskTel
Abstract: 
Advances in technology have enabled incredible opportunities for transformation.  The global pandemic has accelerated the need for this transformation, especially in education.  

In rural areas, a lack of infrastructure has hindered these opportunities, and there is much uncertainty in how best to tackle this problem.  Rather than constantly living in a state of reaction, SaskTel’s Innovation Team recommends taking a step back and looking at the situation through an innovation lens.   This often means making small investments in initiatives to validate their desirability, feasibility, and viability, before making larger ones.   

This presentation will provide an overview of SaskTel’s Innovation Program, how it has led to an innovative models for rural broadband delivery, how it can help reduce the uncertainty and complexity of digital transformation initiatives, and the implications for rural education delivery.

Presenter:
Shelly Kokorudz
Organization:
Brandon University
Abstract: 
School closures, social isolation and the move to online learning create affective pathways in the journeys of students with learning differences.  This presentation will focus on the schooling experiences of three different students with learning differences and their families during COVID-19.  Borrowing from the work of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze, the researcher used the process of rhizoanalysis to construct lines of flight that might provoke readers to re-envisage ways of doing schooling as society moves forward, out of a pandemic.   As COVID-19 forces schools to deliver curriculum to students in ways not so traditionally thought of as common, such as remote learning, the opportunity exists to re-imagine new models for teaching children.  This presentation will focus on some of the ideas brought forward in the case study of these 3 students’ learning experiences.

ruraled/usask_presentation-national-congress-on-rural-ed-2022-2-autosaved.pptx

Session 4: 1:35 –2:20 pm CST

Presenter:
Chad Williams
Organization:
Beyond the Algorithm/University of Saskatchewan
Abstract: 
Families play a pivotal role in the teaching and learning of children, however, a disconnect between families and school mathematics exists. In this session, we will look at how schools and teachers can create meaningful relationships with families as we help children engage in the beauty of mathematics. We will look at how we can provide information to parents regarding current mathematics, how we can set up math nights in our communities, and how we can learn from and share with families the notion that "math is everywhere".

ruraled/engaging-families-in-elementary-mathematics---rural-congress-2022.pdf

Presenters:
Kelli Boklaschuk and Melissa Lander
Organization:
Sun West School Division
Abstract: 
Now is the perfect time to access an online resource to help online learners of all kinds. The world has changed, skills have been learned, it’s the time to extend that learning and leverage scaling our collaborative learning possibilities! The Resource Bank is a curated collection of educational resources to support learners of all ages. As we are ALL Learners, there is benefit to everyone in accessing the Resource Bank. There are currently over 16,000 high quality resources available, and more resources are being added daily. The site is dynamic and has been leveraged for face-to-face, and online learning opportunities in over 147 countries.  This session will explore how to get started using the Resource Bank and show you what is available to support you as an SCC member, Trustee or other learner. We will discuss how you can support your school division getting involved with the Resource Bank and further opportunities for communities to engage with supporting all types of learning from K-12 and beyond. Join us and learn how to leverage this powerful educational tool!

Presenter:
Francisco Villamarín
Organization:
Universidad Regional Amazónica Ikiam
Abstract: 
Ikiam University is an Ecuadorian Public Higher Education Institution, created in 2013 and located in the Amazon Region, at the foothills of the Andes. It is focused on the development of knowledge, science, and high-quality education for the conservation and sustainability of natural resources. Thus, Ikiam is committed to providing solutions to the current social and environmental challenges of Ecuador, the region, and the world.
As a public institution, Ikiam provides access to free education to almost 1800 students from all over the country. Specifically, 44% of the student pupulation is from the Ecuadorian Amazon Region, which is the most biodiverse region in the world, but traditionally, the most forgotten and least favored region of the country.
In this context, low-income students receive free superior education that otherwise would be unable to access to. However, the economic sustainability of the University is very challenging because the budget depends on the willingness of the central government which has severely cut it during  the last two years.

ruraled/presentation-ncre2022_fvillamarin1.pdf

Presenters:
Simone White and Jayne Downey
Organizations:
Montana State University and Queensland University of Technology
Abstract:
This presentation explores the interplay between the notions of rurality, innovation and education as discussed in the book Rural Education Across the World: Models of Innovative Practice and Impact. As editors of this book, we analyzed the chapters by authors across the globe and explored the trends and patterns that emerged. The analysis revealed a hopeful and resilient approach to innovative rural education and scholarship, and collectively, important evidence to speak against an often deficit view of rural education. We will share the patterns, themes and illustrations revealed across the studies, namely: the importance of place-attentive strategies, the importance of joined up alliances to maximize resources and networks, and the need to utilize alternative methodologies that have a starting point of difference rather than deficit for any rural initiative. In short, a tripartite framework of place, people and power are offered as essential to any effective rural education innovation.
Presenter:
Victor Salinas-Silva
Organization:
Pontificia Universidad Catholica de Valparaiso
Abstract: 
In this paper I explore the global countryside of South America, particularly at how climate action is imagined through the lens of rural education. I argue that teachers’ practices can produce rurality in the form of territorialisation phenomena (Santos 2000, 2017), which in South American critical geography is used to describe the overlapping of multiple territorial projects deployed by different agents that seek to transform space. I examine this phenomenon through the case of rural educators in central Chile that teach in school sites of highly connected spaces where functional areas (OECD 2014) open to globalisation have sustained material transformation after two decades of economic boom. This image of rurality may not correspond to the observers’ expectations, therefore reverting back to previous tested ideas of what is rural. The image coexists with rural imaginations of pristine rivers, rural idyll and infinite natural resources depicted in textbooks and national standards, urban-centred teacher assessments and commodities companies’ outreach projects. To negotiate this geographical dissonance, teachers have exhibited an increasingly politicised practice, climate action, professional development but also fractured professional identities and compliance that shed light on the hybrid nature of rurality and the contested narratives that are at play in schools of rural globalised spaces increasingly vulnerable to climate change.           
Bio 
Victor Salinas-Silva is a researcher in the Climate Action Centre at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile and National Geographic Explorer. His work explores how education can produce rurality, particularly in the nexus between rurality, territoriality and teachers’ practice. He is currently working in initial teacher education for primary and secondary teachers and rural education teachers. He has engaged in research on geography education, teachers’ territorialities and rural geography. 

Presenters:
Leyton Schnellert and Miriam Miller
Organization:
University of British Columbia
Abstract: 
Teacher professional learning cannot be reduced to strictly cognitive processes (Hargreaves, 2005). Learning is social and emotional and occurs within relational contexts. This study investigated the role of collaboration within a professional learning network (PLN) and how it can invigorate pedagogical innovation and change for educators working in rural communities.  
We found that participation in the PLN provided emotional support and nourishment to participants as they built relationships, shared ideas, and encouraged each other. Additionally, participating in the PLN countered isolation as the network connected participants across rural and remote locations. Our research demonstrates that affiliation with others who identified as educational innovators acted as a catalyst fueling generativity and collective agency. Attending to rural PLNs offers a window into how isolated educators can advance their practice through collaborative inquiry within and across rural and remote contexts and experience an increased sense of agency in their capacity to be change makers.

ruraled/rural-congress-gi-june-2022.pptx

Presenter:
Andrew Bingham
Organization:
Saskatchewan Polytechnic
Abstract: 
It is often suggested in our time that places other than big cities can offer some kind of special insight into local knowledge and life in community, and with good reason: rural life and education, especially in Canada, offers varied and profound examples of local life and energetic communities, gifts of heritage for contemporary and future generations of learners. In this session, I consider how the healthy ideas of immediacy and distance which underpin our sense of place, learning, civilization, local culture, and community are being strained and challenged by problematic ideas of cultural arrogance and power. I argue that only by fully inhabiting place – and therefore space, and therefore immediacy and distance – and only by traversing the terrain do we come to know and appreciate our rural communities and values. This analysis is then linked to renewed forms of social congregation, cultural hospitality and flourishing, which together constitute the ground and ultimate aim of our rural education and, learning from this, our Canadian education in general.
Presenters:
Astrid Kendrick and David Scott
Organization:
Werklund School of Education/University of Calgary
Abstract: 
In 2015, the Werklund School of Education (WSE) in Calgary, AB began offering a Community-based B.Ed. Program serving students in rural, remote, and Indigenous communities. As online course delivery is an integral part of this program, instructors are always looking for content and meaningful assignments that speak to the unique life experiences of rural, remote, and Indigenous people and contexts. Instructors also seek ways to move beyond online engagement involving reading texts and writing discussion posts as assessments of students’ understanding of course objectives. This presentation will report on findings from a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning grant involving the creation of podcasts for voicEd Radio Canada that fore-fronted the voice of Indigenous educators and rural community leaders discussing how the ideas and theories in two WSE courses were understood and enacted in their unique contexts. The second half of the presentation will discuss feedback received from students in the program on their experiences creating podcasts, which repositioned them from being knowledge consumers to knowledge creators. This interactive part of the presentation will engage with conferences participants on ways to elevate oral literacy – speaking and listening – in online learning courses in order to connect with diverse communities situated in rural and remote settings.
Presenters:
Eliah Anderson and Dr. Laurie Ford 
Organization:
University of British Columbia
Abstract:
Youth in rural areas are exposed to high levels of trauma yet very few studies have explored specific mental health interventions for this population (James et al., 2017).  Schools have long been identified as an ideal location to provide mental health supports (Rones & Hoagwood, 2000) and trauma-informed practices have been shown as an effective treatment for a range of trauma-related symptoms within the school setting (Nadeem et al., 2011). While trauma-informed practices are gaining in popularity, few research has explored a trauma-informed educational approach within rural schools. As rural areas have less access to professional mental health supports, the school system has an opportunity to fill an important void in providing youth mental health supports. This session will present a current summary of the literature on trauma-informed practices within rural schools and conclude with a discussion about future directions.
Presenters:
Benjamin Olayele
Organization:
Saskatchewan Ministy of Education
Abstract: 
This session will engage the audience in a facilitated dialogue and give participants the opportunity to discuss their successes and challenges in engaging families and the wider community to:
  • share responisbility for the success and well-being of all children and youth; 
  • encourage parent, community and youth engagement in school planning and improvement.   Our hope is that participants leave this session with new ideas and appreciation for the work of School Community Councils.
Proposed questions to participants:
  1. What are some of the challenges your School Community Council is facing and how are you addressng them?
  2. What are some of the major successes you have experienced as a School Community Council?
  3. What have you learned during the COVID-19 pandemic that you might be able to build on in the future?